Friday, August 17, 2012

A Lesson in Thanks and Patience


Post by Dylan

Being thankful and being patient are two aspects of writing that come with the territory. When I talk about being thankful I mean that I am thankful that I am not a published author yet. When I talk about being patient…well, I pretty sure all writers have learned this lesson.

Now, what spurred me to write this article was a particularly morbid post from epic fantasy author John Marco. In that post he mentioned that his latest novel, one that he sent off to be edited two years ago, is being pushed back from its November 2012 date to April 2013. When I read this, I could only think of what that would be like to experience, especially as an author that has already published two series.

This is where being thankful that I am not yet a published author comes into the equation. As a fledgling writer it is too easy to become down on one’s self and simply want to get to being a professional. However, something we usually take for granted is all the stress-free creative freedom. As an unpublished and uncontracted author we are free from all the stress of edits that can loom over your head for upwards of two years in John Marco’s case. We can write whatever we want whenever we want and for that I am truly thankful.

Being patient is something that even as an unpublished author we can connect with. While it might not be quite as stressful as awaiting edits, it is certainly a thorn in any writer’s side. Patience is a virtue and sometimes it is very hard to tap in to. But as writers we have to embrace this patience because if we simply throw our words about haphazardly we will never reach our full potential.

So as a published or unpublished writer remember to be patient, because that patience and allowing your words to stew can be the difference between mediocrity and greatness. And as an unpublished author don’t take your creative position for granted. For John Marco, I only wish the best for him and hope that he keeps up his seemingly endless optimism.

Have you ever had any times as a writer that really tried your patience? When were they?

5 comments:

John Marco said...

Dylan, thanks for mentioning in your post and linking to my site. Yes, getting my latest book published has been a lesson in extreme patience! I've learned that publishing is all about waiting, to a ridiculous degree. So I try to separate writing from publishing. I love writing! Publishing? Not so much :)

John Marco said...

Dylan, thanks for mentioning in your post and linking to my site. Yes, getting my latest book published has been a lesson in extreme patience! I've learned that publishing is all about waiting, to a ridiculous degree. So I try to separate writing from publishing. I love writing! Publishing? Not so much :)

Patricia Stoltey said...

Dylan, I found that almost everything tried my patience at the beginning. I'm a little more relaxed about the whole process now because I stay so busy.

I hear so many successful writers say what John said, "I love writing! Publishing? Not so much." I agree.

Maggie said...

I find staying patient as a writer trying and exhausting, especially on a 2 agent rejection day like yesterday. It was helpful and hopeful to get positive rejections this month with comments of especially liking my voice and my writing poise and polish. Most days I can't imagine giving up, but I do so agree with John, too. Publishing, wow, that's one difficult game to play.

Thanks for the great post, Dylan.

Dylan Book Reader said...

John: Thank you for stopping by. Thank you for the wise words about seperation of writing from publishing, that will definitely come in handy in the future.
Patricia: It's good to hear that you are more relaxed in your process. I hope you're busy in the best way possible, writing.
Maggie: I absolutely love your optimism. Way to look at the silver lining in life. I know everything will work out for you.

Share a Post